Setting Up Your New Snow Thrower

I got the box home! Now What!

This is will take you 20 minutes to complete.  Ten minutes to read the operator’s manual and ten minutes to set up your new snow thrower.

Open the box

Grab the plastic bag and read the operators manual.

Disclaimer:  I am explaining to you from years of experience how to set up and start your snow thrower.  I am using a typical two-stage snow thrower as an example.  If the operator’s manual instructs you to do something different than what I say here always follow those instructions, not mine.

Cut one end out of the box

Drag the snowthrower out. You may have to cut some straps or lift it off some wood blocking to get it out.

Check the cable from the gear selector on the handle and make sure cables are routed through the pulleys

Lift up the handles and tighten the two wing nuts where the handle pivots.

Install the discharge chute as shown in the manual if needed.  If your snow thrower has the new single joystick control the chute is most likely already installed.  If it takes a tool to install the manual will tell you what you need.

Check the engine oil.  Make sure the oil is up to the “full” mark on the dipstick.  If your motor does not have a dipstick open the oil fill plug (the manual will show you where) and the oil should look like it is just about ready to overflow out of the hole.  If you need to add oil use a heavy duty 5W-30.

The tire pressure as shipped is higher than you need.  Adjust the tire pressure using a tire gauge. 15 – 20 lbs in each tire is good.  MAKE SURE THE TIRE PRESSURE IS EQUAL IN BOTH TIRES.  If is not equal the snowblower will pull to one side when moving.

Tape the extra shear pins to the handle.  I use a heavy duty clear packing tape.

Look it all over one more time and check to see if there is any packing material stuck in it anywhere.

Check the height of the skid shoes.  (See the manual for exactly how to adjust the shoes) If you are using it on smooth cement or blacktop, adjust the shoes so the wear bar is just off the ground (about 1/8 inch)  If your cement sidewalk or drive has parts of it that have dropped or raised you may have to raise the unit a litttle more so you don’t get stuck on those.  If you are going to use it on gravel or clean a dog run in your back yard adjust the shoes so there is more of a gap between the wear bar and the ground (about a 1/4 inch is usually good).

Check the oil level. Most snow throwers come pre-filled or there is the right amount of oil in the plastic bag.

Fill it with fuel.  All the new motors run on regular grade car gas. BUT!!! Some of the smaller single stage snow throwers use a oil/gas mix.  Please read the operator’s manual if you are not sure.

NOTE:  The starting procedure for a snowblower is a little different than starting your lawn mower.  There is an extra step or two and it takes the motor a little longer to start running smoothly in really cold weather.

Put in the safety key.  (If you have kids or anyone who may play with your machine when you are not around I suggest always pulling this key when you are not using the snowblower and hanging it up in a cabinet or someplace out of reach)

Turn the start switch to run,

Turn the choke to closed.  When you close the choke you may notice it click’s as you turn it.  That is normal and those clicks are used to help the machine warm up when you first start it or stay running in really cold weather.

Push the prime button four times.

Plug one end of the starter cord into the starter on your snowblower and the other into a 110 volt outlet.  (normal house outlet)

Push the start button and 2 to 5 seconds after the engine fires, start turning the choke to open one click at a time until the engine runs smoothly.  My 10 year old machine usually takes about 10 seconds to do this starting procedure.  A new machine may take less time.

Note:  When you are starting your snow thrower the engine exhaust may spew out steam or a dark gray smoke when it first starts.  This is normal for the first 10 to 30 seconds and while you are adjusting the choke to full open.

Move the snowblower outside.  I always push down on the handles and lift the front end off the ground when I’m moving it out of the garage.  That way I don’t pick up a wandering screw or rock that may be on the floor of my garage. (I’m a woodworker and I drop things)

Once outside aim the discharge chute away from anything (like your car, the windows, etc.) that might be damaged from flying debris.

Push down on the handle that starts the auger.  Increase the engine speed to full (rabbit) and if everything is running smoothly, start blowing snow!!

If you have to stop moving snow and come inside to warm up remember to park your snow thrower close enough to the house so you can hook up the starter cord if you want to use the electric starter to start it again.

Have fun!

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